Duane Keilstrup Broadcast Archives
January, 2021

Philco RadioClick to hear the Program of 1-10-21

This Week's Classics & Curios Show:

"Echoes of Songs and Laughter"

Episode 420

CLASSICS & CURIOS PRESENTS JOYFUL NOISE #1 WITH THE LIGHT CRUST DOUGHBOYS

Welcome to the 2021 premier of the first Joyful Noise feature on Classics & Curios. Joyful Noise will especially highlight Gospel songs and Gospel quartets, together with al mix of joyful Dixieland, big band swing, feel-good songs, and classic artists, Joyful Noise is based on Psalm 98 where it tells us to make a joyful noise before the Lord, the King — with singing and musical instruments.

This Joyful Noise will feature the longest running band in the history of recorded music — the Light Crust Doughboys — on a show from 1948 on 170 radio stations across the South and Southwest. Longtime bandleader Smokey Montgomery is introduced with his early radio name Junior playing the tenor banjo and on vocal. Announcer Jack Perry has a message especially appropriate for America today — 73 years later.

The Doughboys band of 1948 plays the joyful upbeat positive pop tunes “San Antonio Rose,” “Camptown Races,” and “Lucky Days,” along with a special Gospel tune — “These Bones Will Rise Again,” sung by the Doughboy Band Quartet.

The 1948 sound quality has badges of aging, but as I say on the show, “So do I — at age 85.”

Also on this premier show will be songs from the current Doughboys’ 90th anniversary celebration.

Here’s the Playbill of those songs:

Send the Light — sung by current LCD bandleader Art Greenhaw
The Great Speckled Bird — from a LCD Grammy-nominated album
An Unclouded Day — from the LCD Grammy-winning album with legendary singer James Blackwood
How Great Thou Art — a LCD soul-soothing instrumental rendition

The LCD Closing Theme

After each song I hope you’ll echo the words often spoken by Smokey, “I tell you for sure — mighty fine! Mighty fine!”

So as Scripture commands, let’s all make a joyful noise of praise to the Lord, our King, and sing of His lovingkindness and saving grace in Christ, our Savior!

NOTES on “The Great Speckled Bird”:

To me the song is one of victory in Jesus! The great speckled bird seems to represent spiritual Israel being persecuted by Judah — or God in Christ being attacked on all sides. But, as the song’s lyrics proclaim, we as believers will be “joyfully carried to meet Him (God) on the wings of the great speckled bird (Christ).” We could perhaps carry the analogy further and see Christ and believers like Paul and today’s Christians persecuted by non-believers but finally victorious together in the sweet by and by. .

Philco RadioClick to hear the Program of 1-17-21

This Week's Classics & Curios Show:

"Echoes of Songs and Laughter"

Episode 421

CLASSICS & CURIOS PRESENTS JOYFUL NOISE # 2: THE LIGHT CRUST DOUGHBOYS ARE ON THE AIR AGAIN THROUGH THE YEARS

Time again for more Joyful Noise on Classics & Curios. The LCD take the spotlight again — first with another broadcast from 1948 and then with a few songs from their 90th year celebration.

So set your radio dial to 1948 and enjoy feel-good songs like “Moonlight and Roses,” “A Tree in the Meadow,” “The Crawdad Song,” and the show’s highlight hymn — “If I Could Hear My Mother Pray Again,” sung by the Doughboys Trio.

Announcer Jack Perry sends uplifting thoughts about the value of work, along with a little country humor and promises of tasty biscuits with Light Crust flour.

Then get ready for more feel-good joyful noises with LCD songs through the years after 1948 with Smokey Montgomery and current leader Art Greenhaw.

The Playbill begins with uplifting happy tunes like:

12th Street Rag
The World Is Waiting for the Sunrise
Under the Double Eagle
The Yellow Rose of Texas
and a rare one … Turkey for Thanksgiving

This show’s Gospel songs include:

The Church in the Wildwood
The Bells of Saint Mary’s
Hear Dem Bells
Washed in the Blood of the Lamb by Grammy-winner and legendary singer James Blackwood
Beethoven’s Ode to Joy — a truly joyful noise!

And finally, the Doughboys conclude the show with their 90-year-old theme song. So, I hope you will agree with Smokey who would say again, “I tell you for sure — mighty fine, mighty fine!”

Let’s make a joyful noise to the Lord each day, singing in our hearts about God’s lovingkindness and His saving grace in Jesus Christ.

From deep in the heart of Texas, “Fare Thee Well,” God bless, and God bless America!! .

Philco RadioClick to hear the Program of 1-24-21

This Week's Classics & Curios Show:

"Echoes of Songs and Laughter"

Episode 423

CLASSICS & CURIOS PRESENTS THE AMOS AND ANDY MUSIC HALL AND THE CHAMBER MUSIC SOCIETY OF LOWER BASIN STREET— BOTH WITH HISTORICAL MOMENTS

A German proverb says, Geteilte Freude ist doppelte Freude! — Shared joy is doubled joy! This Episode shares 2 of God’s most precious joys: Laughter and music! — and here laughter and music combine to bring enhanced double joy to listeners: Amos and Andy Musical Hall and The Chamber Musuc Society of Lower Basin Street.

These shows are special in another way also — they both have personal messages from performers. On the CMSLBS legendary Dixieland song writer and musician W.C. Handy tells about his compositions and on the AAMH Freeman Gosden and Charles Correll tell about the history of their shows, offer thanks to the audience, and announce the end of the AAMH show.

We start with two episodes of The Amos and Andy Music Hall starring George “Kingfish” Stevens. The Music Hall shows highlighted the familiar banter between the Kingfish and Andy, especially the misuse of English and the Kingfish’s mishandling of financial matters, much like he did with Kay Kyser on a previous program when he ended up paying Kay to keep from being sued for claiming Andy wrote the song “Sunday, Monday, or Always.”

Frank Sinatra is a guest on the first show and the source of another financial problem. In his interview with Sinatra, the Kingfish demonstrates his ignorance of Frank’s life and career but Frank has the last laugh.

Songs introduced by the show’s hosts include:

Crazy ‘Bout You, Baby by The Crew Cuts
I Need You Now by Eddy Fisher
This Old House by Rosemary Clooney
If I give My Heart to You by Doris Day
and Birth of the Blues by Frank Sinatra, his favorite among his recordings

In the second AAMH show, the last one in the seven year series, there is a short segment reminiscent of previous A & A shows involving the Kingfish’s wife Sapphire and his brother-in-law LeRoy. The segment sets up the only song featured: the famous A & A theme song with the perfect title “The Perfect Song.”

The show then concludes with Gosden’s and Correll’s personal message about the history of A & A and the news of the conclusion of the A & A Music Hall.

Next is a very unique episode of CMSLBS. First, this is one of the earlier 1940’s shows when as I pointed out in my previous Chamber programs, the show flourished on the NBC Blue Network with tongue-in-cheek, humorous, quasi-long-haired stuffiness, but the music was clearly down-to-earth — pure, genuine, joyful Dixieland jazz. So the show was all about having fun and making fun. Second, this show features legendary jazz “immortal” W.C. Handy, with guest Dinah Shore. “Doctor” Gino “Long Locks” Hamilton introduces songs, which include:

Beale Street Blues, W.C. Handy on piano
Loveless Love sung by Dinah Shore
Saint Louis Blues, W.C. Handy on trumpet
Yellow Dog Blues
Memphis Blues sung by Dinah
Sounding Brass and Clanging Symbols, lyrics voiced by Handy, based on 1 Corinthians 13
Aunt Hagar’s Children’s Blues based on the Biblical story of Abraham, Sarah, and Hagar

Announcer Jackamo “Satchel Trousers” McCarthy opens the program, and Hamilton reads words by W.C. Handy along the way, and later Handy voices his own words about his music, the problems he faced and overcame, and about the opportunity young people have in America if they have the will to win — a very special moment on radio in the 1940’s and appropriate for every generation.

There is a missing word or two in the Chamber show’s transcription, but the show’s unique content easily supersedes any faultiness in the original recording.

So enjoy the musical ensembles of Paul Laval and Henry Levine, along with Dinah Shore and W.C. Handy on the CMSLBS.

It;s my prayer that such programs may bring joy to your heart, a smile to your soul, and glory to God, who lovingly blesses us with laughter and joyful music.

NOTES

See The Original Amos 'n Andy: Freeman Gosden, Charles Correll, and the 1928-1943 Radio Serial. McFarland & Co., 2005.

For an incisive and insightful study on Amos and Andy see The Original Amos 'n Andy: Freeman Gosden, Charles Correll, and the 1928-1943 Radio Serial. Elizabeth McLeod, McFarland & Co., 2005.

The CMSLB low-key chairman, the witty Gene Hamilton (always introduced as "Dr. Gino Hamilton"), would call the meeting to order, peppering his formal speech with slang: "There are those critics of the saxophone who say it is merely an unfortunate cross between a lovesick oboe and a slap-happy clarinet. To those critics we must say, 'Kindly step outside with us a moment' and 'Is there a doctor in the house?'"

These off-center comments were actually scripted by Welbourn Kelley, but Hamilton's deadpan deliveries often made the musicians laugh out loud. The program then delivered 30 minutes of blues and hot jazz, with Dr. Gino stepping in between numbers to deliver such comments as, "A Bostonian looks like he's smelling something. A New Yorker looks like he's found it." Two resident bands provided the music. Henry Levine and His Dixieland Octet offered traditional "readings" of jazz standards such as "Farewell Blues," "St. Louis Blues," and "When My Sugar Walks Down the Street." Trumpeter Levine, a former member of the Original Dixieland Jazz Band, was quite familiar with these arrangements. Paul Laval and His “Woodwindy Ten” (which included some of Levine's personnel) played the same type of music on more symphonic instruments, demonstrating that such instruments as oboe, bassoon, and celeste were equally capable of producing hot jazz.

The Chamber Music Society of Lower Basin Street made its debut on February 11, 1940. During its first months on NBC it was a sustaining feature (meaning unsponsored) in a late-Sunday-afternoon (4:30 p.m. ET) time slot. It soon developed a loyal following, and on September 16, 1940 NBC began airing the show in prime time, on Monday nights at 9 p.m. ET. The final broadcast was aired on October 8, 1944. The program aired later in 1950 as a replacement for TheJudy Canova Show. . .

Philco RadioClick to hear the Program of 1-31-21

This Week's Classics & Curios Show:

"Echoes of Songs and Laughter"

Episode 423

CLASSICS & CURIOS PRESENTS THE AMOS AND ANDY MUSIC HALL AND THE CHAMBER MUSIC SOCIETY OF LOWER BASIN STREET— BOTH WITH HISTORICAL MOMENTS

A German proverb says, Geteilte Freude ist doppelte Freude! — Shared joy is doubled joy! This Episode shares 2 of God’s most precious joys: Laughter and music! — and here laughter and music combine to bring enhanced double joy to listeners: Amos and Andy Musical Hall and The Chamber Musuc Society of Lower Basin Street.

These shows are special in another way also — they both have personal messages from performers. On the CMSLBS legendary Dixieland song writer and musician W.C. Handy tells about his compositions and on the AAMH Freeman Gosden and Charles Correll tell about the history of their shows, offer thanks to the audience, and announce the end of the AAMH show.

We start with two episodes of The Amos and Andy Music Hall starring George “Kingfish” Stevens. The Music Hall shows highlighted the familiar banter between the Kingfish and Andy, especially the misuse of English and the Kingfish’s mishandling of financial matters, much like he did with Kay Kyser on a previous program when he ended up paying Kay to keep from being sued for claiming Andy wrote the song “Sunday, Monday, or Always.”

Frank Sinatra is a guest on the first show and the source of another financial problem. In his interview with Sinatra, the Kingfish demonstrates his ignorance of Frank’s life and career but Frank has the last laugh.

Songs introduced by the show’s hosts include:

Crazy ‘Bout You, Baby by The Crew Cuts
I Need You Now by Eddy Fisher
This Old House by Rosemary Clooney
If I give My Heart to You by Doris Day
and Birth of the Blues by Frank Sinatra, his favorite among his recordings

In the second AAMH show, the last one in the seven year series, there is a short segment reminiscent of previous A & A shows involving the Kingfish’s wife Sapphire and his brother-in-law LeRoy. The segment sets up the only song featured: the famous A & A theme song with the perfect title “The Perfect Song.”

The show then concludes with Gosden’s and Correll’s personal message about the history of A & A and the news of the conclusion of the A & A Music Hall.

Next is a very unique episode of CMSLBS. First, this is one of the earlier 1940’s shows when as I pointed out in my previous Chamber programs, the show flourished on the NBC Blue Network with tongue-in-cheek, humorous, quasi-long-haired stuffiness, but the music was clearly down-to-earth — pure, genuine, joyful Dixieland jazz. So the show was all about having fun and making fun. Second, this show features legendary jazz “immortal” W.C. Handy, with guest Dinah Shore. “Doctor” Gino “Long Locks” Hamilton introduces songs, which include:

Beale Street Blues, W.C. Handy on piano
Loveless Love sung by Dinah Shore
Saint Louis Blues, W.C. Handy on trumpet
Yellow Dog Blues
Memphis Blues sung by Dinah
Sounding Brass and Clanging Symbols, lyrics voiced by Handy, based on 1 Corinthians 13
Aunt Hagar’s Children’s Blues based on the Biblical story of Abraham, Sarah, and Hagar

Announcer Jackamo “Satchel Trousers” McCarthy opens the program, and Hamilton reads words by W.C. Handy along the way, and later Handy voices his own words about his music, the problems he faced and overcame, and about the opportunity young people have in America if they have the will to win — a very special moment on radio in the 1940’s and appropriate for every generation.

There is a missing word or two in the Chamber show’s transcription, but the show’s unique content easily supersedes any faultiness in the original recording.

So enjoy the musical ensembles of Paul Laval and Henry Levine, along with Dinah Shore and W.C. Handy on the CMSLBS.

It;s my prayer that such programs may bring joy to your heart, a smile to your soul, and glory to God, who lovingly blesses us with laughter and joyful music.

NOTES

For an incisive and insightful study on Amos and Andy see The Original Amos 'n Andy: Freeman Gosden, Charles Correll, and the 1928-1943 Radio Serial. Elizabeth McLeod, McFarland & Co., 2005.

The CMSLB low-key chairman, the witty Gene Hamilton (always introduced as "Dr. Gino Hamilton"), would call the meeting to order, peppering his formal speech with slang: "There are those critics of the saxophone who say it is merely an unfortunate cross between a lovesick oboe and a slap-happy clarinet. To those critics we must say, 'Kindly step outside with us a moment' and 'Is there a doctor in the house?'"

These off-center comments were actually scripted by Welbourn Kelley, but Hamilton's deadpan deliveries often made the musicians laugh out loud. The program then delivered 30 minutes of blues and hot jazz, with Dr. Gino stepping in between numbers to deliver such comments as, "A Bostonian looks like he's smelling something. A New Yorker looks like he's found it." Two resident bands provided the music. Henry Levine and His Dixieland Octet offered traditional "readings" of jazz standards such as "Farewell Blues," "St. Louis Blues," and "When My Sugar Walks Down the Street." Trumpeter Levine, a former member of the Original Dixieland Jazz Band, was quite familiar with these arrangements. Paul Laval and His “Woodwindy Ten” (which included some of Levine's personnel) played the same type of music on more symphonic instruments, demonstrating that such instruments as oboe, bassoon, and celeste were equally capable of producing hot jazz.

The Chamber Music Society of Lower Basin Street made its debut on February 11, 1940. During its first months on NBC it was a sustaining feature (meaning unsponsored) in a late-Sunday-afternoon (4:30 p.m. ET) time slot. It soon developed a loyal following, and on September 16, 1940 NBC began airing the show in prime time, on Monday nights at 9 p.m. ET. The final broadcast was aired on October 8, 1944. The program aired later in 1950 as a replacement for TheJudy Canova Show. . .

.