Duane Keilstrup Broadcast Archives
February, 2020

Philco Radio Click to hear the Program of 2-2-20

This Week's Classics & Curios Show:

"Echoes of Songs and Laughter"

Episode 377

CLASSICS & CURIOS CONTINUES WITH 2 MORE 1947 BROADCASTS OF THE HISTORIC PROGRAM “THIS IS JAZZ” STARTING SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 2 , ON JERRY HAENDIGES’ OLDE TYME RADIO NETWORK ONLINE (downloadable)

We continue on with what jazz pioneer and Jazzology founder George H. Buck called “one of the greatest jazz programs ever aired in the history of jazz.” These shows of “This Is Jazz,” covering the period from 1870-1947 are virtually all collector pieces.

Jazz historian and author Rudi Blesh is bandleader and narrator of the weekly Saturday afternoon thirty-minute broadcasts on Mutual station WOR in New York. Rudi introduces the band while explaining the melody and rhythm makeup of basic ragtime jazz. He also comments on the history and intricacies and subtleties of pure jazz , and on this week’s programs broadens the jazz spectrum to include Chicago style jazz.

Chicago style jazz was a style of small band jazz popular in Chicago in the 1920s and 1930s that derived from New Orleans style, but emphasized greater solo time, fixed ensembles, and a more prominent role for the rhythm section. Blesh emphasizes the vitality of jazz music in the 1920’s which inspired dancing in the same energetic spirit invoked by the music.

Some of the tunes on programs of 03-08-47 and 03-15-47 include:

At the Jazz Band Ball
JaDa
Dark Town Strutters Ball
Relaxin’ at the Touro
I Don’t Like That
Dinah
River Side Blues
Southside Shake
Someday Sweetheart
Fidgety Feet

Musicans include Muggsy Spanier, Albert Nicholas, George Brunies, Baby Dodds, Dan Burley, & Danny Barker

NOTES (from online sources)

Dan Burley — Guest on piano
During the mid-'40s, he was part of a sort of musical critic's summit with Leonard Feather, also a pianist. Of more importance was a group he assembled in 1946 called Dan Burley & His Skiffle Boys ...

This is supposedly the group, and the record, that established the term "skiffle" as a musical style, in some ways similar to jug band music, at least according to the published word of Burley's old pal Feather. Skiffle became especially popular in England, influencing early rock & roll, and eventually the Beatles, none of which are developments that seemed to have much impact on Burley, who died in the early '60s. The pianist also appears on several excellent Lionel Hampton sides from 1946.

Chicago style jazz was a style of small band jazz popular in Chicago in the 1920s and 1930s that derived from New Orleans style, but emphasized greater solo time, fixed ensembles, and a more prominent role for the rhythm section. Radio host Rudi Blesh emphasizes the vitality of jazz music in the 1920’s which inspired dancing in the same energetic spirit invoked by the music.

The "Great Migration" of poor black workers from the South into the industrial cities brought traditional jazz and blues music to Chicago, resulting in Chicago blues and "Chicago-style" Dixieland jazz.
wikipedia

People were drawn to Chicago for its wealthy manufacturing, railroad, and meatpacking industries. This move included the expansion of popular music styles, bringing jazz to Chicago and the rest of the country. In the Windy City, jazz started out in small local clubs on the South Side.Aug 29, 2016

Jazz seems to have originated among white Americans, and the earliest printed uses are in California baseball writing, where it means “lively, energetic.” The word still carries this meaning, as in “Let’s jazz this up!” — Etymologist Professor Gerald Cohen

The word “jazz” probably derives from the slang word “jasm,” which originally meant energy, vitality, spirit, pep. The Oxford English Dictionary, the most reliable and complete record of the English language, traces “jasm” back to at least 1860.
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Philco Radio Click to hear the Program of 2-9-20

This Week's Classics & Curios Show:

"Echoes of Songs and Laughter"

Episode 378

CLASSICS & CURIOS CONTINUES WITH 2 ADDED 1947 BROADCASTS OF THE HISTORIC PROGRAM “THIS IS JAZZ” STARTING SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 9 , ON JERRY HAENDIGES’ OLDE TYME RADIO NETWORK ONLINE (downloadable)

Here’s more of with what jazz pioneer and Jazzology founder George H. Buck called “one of the greatest jazz programs ever aired in the history of jazz.” These shows of “This Is Jazz,” covering the period from 1870-1947 are virtually all collector pieces. When you listen to “This Is Jazz,” as Bing Crosby said to Louis Armstrong in the movie “High Society,” “Now you ‘has’ jazz.”

Jazz historian and author Rudi Blesh is bandleader and narrator of the weekly Saturday afternoon thirty-minute broadcasts on Mutual station WOR in New York. Rudi introduces the All-Star Stompers band while pointing out the improvisational nature of jazz and how improvisations almost miraculously fit together even though each new playing of a tune is different and also mentions the roaming synchronization of New Orleans style jazz. Altogether, Rudi adds, it’s an "American art form reflecting joy of living in both sweet and hot music."

On these new broadcasts we hear jazz artists Muggsy Spanier, Albert Nicholas, George Brunies, Baby Dodds, Dan Burley, Bob Faulkner, Frank “Pops” Foster, & Danny Barker, as well as guests Sidney Bichet and Joe Sullivan.

Featured songs on the two thirty-minute shows from March of 1947 include:

Sensational Rag
Twelth Street Rag
Buddy Bolden’s Blues (See Notes below.)
You’re Some Pretty Doll
What Did I Do to Be So Black and Blue?
Farewell Blues
Sheik of Araby
Sweet Lorraine
At Sundown
Sweet Lovin’ Man
Little Rock Getaway
Way Down Yonder in New Orleans (theme)

NOTES (Cornetist Buddy Bolden)

Buddy Bolden’s Blues” was written by Jelly Roll Morton. “Charles Joseph "Buddy" Bolden (September 6, 1877 – November 4, 1931) was an African-American cornetist who was regarded by contemporaries as a key figure in the development of a New Orleans style of ragtime music, or "jass", which later came to be known as jazz. Bolden was known as "King" Bolden, and his band was popular in New Orleans from around 1900 to 1907. He was known for his loud sound and improvisational skills, and his style had an impact on younger musicians.

(The Bolden band around 1905 (top: Jimmy Johnson, bass; Bolden, cornet; Willy Cornish, valve trombone; Willy Warner, clarinet; bottom: Brock Mumford, guitar; Frank Lewis, clarinet)

Many early jazz musicians credited Bolden and his bandmates with having originated what came to be known as jazz, though the term was not in common musical use until after the era of Bolden's prominence. At least one writer has labeled Bolden the father of jazz. (Ted Gioia) He is credited with creating a looser, more improvised version of ragtime and adding blues; Bolden's band was said to be the first to have brass instruments play the blues. He was also said to have adapted ideas from gospel music heard in uptown African-American Baptist churches.[

Instead of imitating other cornetists, Bolden played music he heard "by ear" and adapted it to his horn. In doing so, he created an exciting and novel fusion of ragtime, black sacred music, marching-band music, and rural blues. He rearranged the typical New Orleans dance band of the time to better accommodate the blues: string instruments became the rhythm section, and the front-line instruments were clarinets, trombones, and Bolden's cornet. Bolden was known for his powerful, loud, "wide open" playing style. Joe "King" Oliver, Freddie Keppard, Bunk Johnson, and other early New Orleans jazz musicians were directly inspired by his playing.” — Wikipedia

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Philco Radio Click to hear the Program of 2-23-20

This Week's Classics & Curios Show:

"Echoes of Songs and Laughter"

Episode 379

CLASSICS & CURIOS BRINGS TWO MORE 1947 BROADCASTS OF THE HISTORIC PROGRAM “THIS IS JAZZ” STARTING SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 23 , ON JERRY HAENDIGES’ OLDE TYME RADIO NETWORK ONLINE (downloadable)

Episode 379 We continue with two more of what jazz pioneer and Jazzology founder George H. Buck called “one of the greatest jazz programs ever aired in the history of jazz.” These shows of “This Is Jazz,” covering the period from 1870-1947 are virtually all collector pieces. When you listen to “This Is Jazz,” as Bing Crosby said to Louis Armstrong in the movie “High Society,” “Now you ‘has’ jazz.”

Jazz historian and author Rudi Blesh is bandleader and narrator of the weekly Saturday afternoon thirty-minute broadcasts on Mutual station WOR in New York. Rudi points out the improvisation nature of jazz and how improvisations almost miraculously fit together even though each new playing of a tune is different so that each performer is in effect a composer. Rudi adds, "it’s an “American art form reflecting joy of living in both sweet and hot music.”

On the second broadcast of this episode Rudi’s special guests are jazz legends Brownie and Granville McGhee. Band members are called on and choose several of the songs this time.

Featured tunes on these two thirty-minute shows from April of 1947 include:

Sweet Georgia Brown
A Good Man Is Hard to Find
September in the Rain
Lonesome Road
Love Is Just Around the Corner
I Used to Love You
There’ll Be Some Changes Made
Heartaches
My Honey’s Lovin’ Arms
I’m Leavin’ in the Morning
Ja-Da
Organ Grinder Blues
When the Saints Go Marchin’ In

NOTES (from Wikipedia on “Ja-Da”)

In his definitive American Popular Songs, Alec Wilder writes about the song's simplicity:

"... It fascinates me that such a trifling tune could have settled into the public consciousness as Ja-Da has. Of course it's bone simple, and the lyric says almost nothing, except perhaps the explanation of its success lies in the lyric itself. 'That's a funny little bit of melody —it's so soothing and appealing to me'. It's cute, it's innocent, and it's 'soothing. And, wonderfully enough, the only other statement the lyric makes is 'Ja-Da, Ja-Da, Ja-Da, Ja-Da, Jing, Jing, Jing'."

"Ja-Da, Ja-Da, Ja-Da, Ja-Da
Jing, Jing, Jing
Ja-Da, Ja-Da, Ja-Da, Ja-Da
Jing, Jing, Jing
That's a funny little bit of melody
It's so soothing and appealing to me
It goes Ja-Da, Ja-Da, Ja-Da, Ja-Da
Jing, Jing, Jing"

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