Duane Keilstrup Broadcast Archives
May 2018

Philco Radio Click to hear the Program of 5-6-18

This Week's Classics & Curios Show:

"Echoes of Songs and Laughter"

Episode 297

“HERE COME THE BIG BANDS, AGAIN,” WITH STILL MORE GREAT SWINGING BIG BANDS!

Ted Lawrence, host of “Here Come the Big Bands, Again,” spotlights classic bands and a few "up and coming new” groups from the 1930’s and 1940’s on this new Episode of Classics & Curios. Some playlist highlights:

WELL KNOWN CLASSIC BANDS:
Sy Oliver and “Well, Git It”
Artie Shaw: “Frenesi”
Tommy Dorsey: “Dippermouth Blues”
Billy May: “Bye Bye, Blackbird”
Glenn Miller: “The Anvil Chorus”
Charlie Barnet: “Evergreen”
Richard Maltby: “Saint Louis Blues Mambo”
Jimmy Lunceford: “Rhythm Is Our Business” (with Sy Oliver on vocal)
Benny Carter: “June Is Busting Out All Over”

LESSER KNOWN BUT WELL WORTH A LISTEN: Keith Williams
Jackie Cane
Jimmy Palmer
Chico Fuentes
Don Jacoby
Henri Rene

Ted Lawrence offers some informative introductions in a fast paced format.on these twenty-five minute ABC radio and AFRS programs.

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Philco Radio Click to hear the Program of 5-13-18


This Week's Classics & Curios Show:

"Echoes of Songs and Laughter"

Episode 298

EDDIE HUBBARD SPECIAL: WHY DON'T YOU EVER PLAY! AN ENCORE FOR SPECIAL MOMS!

Songs Moms probably enjoyed long ago. Here's another Eddie Hubbard Special, this one from October 3, 1985, the day that the Atlantis space shuttle was launched on its first space flight. Eddie called this Special "Why Don't You Ever Play!" with requests from listeners for songs that have not been played for awhile or ever. The songs include "Just An Old Fashioned Love Song," "Golden Memories, Silver Tears," '"You've Changed," "Just a Gigolo," "The Summer Wind," "Hurry on Down," and "Poor Butterfly” -- good songs to celebrate Mothers Day because chances are that senior Moms like mine loved most of these songs.

Three songs on this Special really seem to stand out: "Won't You Marry Me?" "Little Old Lady," and "Everything Is Beautiful (in It's Own Way).'" The curio "Marry Me" was recorded by Maxine Sullivan, who was the first black star to have her own radio show ("Flow Gently, Sweet Rhythm" in 1940).

"Everything is Beautiful" by Ray Stevens remains a classic upbeat, encouraging song that plays in one's mind and heart long after hearing it just once. Hoagy Carmichael's "Little Old Lady" is a sweet song that my mother used to hum and sing and remains forever part of my cherished childhood memories, and I would guess, part of the special memories of many from my generation.

Other artists on the show include "Velvet Voice" "Gentleman" Jim Reeves, "Velvet Fog" Mel Torme, Eydie Gorme, Tony Martin, Paul Williams, Wayne Newton, Ray Conniff. and Montovani (Great Britain's most successful album seller before the Beatles).

Every Eddie Hubbard show demonstrates some of the great music of a great generation in the first 60 years or so of the twentieth century -- great blessings of the great God of the universe.

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Many thanks go to Jerry Haendiges Productions for restoring and transferring Eddie Hubbard's original studio tape for rebroadcast. For more about Jerry's expert Audio Restoration Services go to his website at www.OTRSite.com or call him at 562-696-4387

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Philco Radio Click to hear the Program of 5-20-18


This Week's Classics & Curios Show:

"Echoes of Songs and Laughter"

Episode 299

HERE COME THE BIG BANDS, AGAIN — AGAIN! RAY ANTHONY, STAN KENTON, GEORGIE AULD AND MORE

On ABC radio and the AFRS “Here Come the Big Bands, Again” — Again! On this Classics & Curios episode “Man About Music” Ted Lawrence showcases more programs featuring fine orchestras and great songs, mostly from the 1930’s and 1940’s.

Ray Anthony, at one time a member of Glenn Miller’s band, begins the first show with “Mr. Anthony’s Boogie.” Other bands on the bill include:

Nelson Riddle with “No Letter Today”
Harry James with “Just Lucky”
Ted Heath with “The Man I Love”
Larry Clinton with “A Study in Brown”
Bob Sloan with “I Remember April”
This program ends with a short clip from the “Dictionary of Freedom.”

On the next show Stan Kenton takes the spotlight throughout with songs and bits and pieces on his career. Once known as “The Kansas Kid,” Kenton eventually introduced a new jazz orchestral dissonant sound with the recording “Baubles, Bangles, and Beads,” as he focused on music as concert oriented rather than for dancing, as listeners became spectators.

Critic George T. Simon wrote, “Within the Stan Kenton band nestles one of the greatest combinations of rhythm, harmony and melody that’s ever been assembled by one leader.” Though Kenton “mellowed” somewhat in later years his music remained “controversial” and at times ‘ponderous,” “depressive,” yet “impressive” and even “exciting,” according to Simon.

Other recordings by Kenton on this broadcast, besides his theme “Artistry in Rhythm,” include “Love Letters,” “Eager Beaver” and “Lover.”

Finally, Ted Lawrence brings Canadian Georgie Auld and his brilliant and biting tenor sax to be the focus of this Episode’s last program as he plays “Back Home Again in Indiana,” “Blue Lou,” “Dinah,” “They Can’t Take That Away From Me,” “Swinging’ in the Moore Park,” and “Tippin’ In.” Auld played with Artie Shaw (leading Artie’s band briefly until it disbanded), Benny Goodman, Bunny Berrigan, and, as Lawrence points out, he was influenced especially by Jimmy Lunceford’s back beat shuffle style behind the melody.

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