Duane Keilstrup Broadcast Archives
January, 2015

Philco Radio Click to hear the Program of 12-28-2014
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This Week's Classics & Curios Show:

"Echoes of Songs and Laughter"

Episode 152

A CLASSICS & CURIOS CELEBRATION OF NEW YEARS WITH CLASSIC SONGS FROM YEARS PAST

This show will celebrate the current New Year with some song favorites from 1945, along with traditional songs by Guy Lombardo and Margaret Whiting and a New Years recitation from Frank Sinatra. Another song sings of heartfelt celebration upon the return of our troops to their sweethearts at the end of World War II. A New Years celebration is a time for positive thoughts, and we'll hear a song that definitely "Accentuate(s) the Positive." Still another tune celebrates our longing for freedom under starry skies.

Guy Lombardo reprises a Christmas/New Years performance at Lake Tahoe in 1958 with his Lombardo Medley and "Auld Lang Syne." Frank Sinatra recites a beautiful little piece telling us "God's in His heaven and all is right with the world." Margaret Whiting performs her "What Are You Doing New Years?" for us. And then my favorite performers any time of the year, Bing Crosby and the trio of the Andrews Sisters, do two of my very favorite songs that are great any time of the year: "Accentuate the Positive" from 1944-45 and 1945's "Don't Fence Me In."

Hold on to your heart as Kitty Kallen sings the wonderful ballad for our soldiers and their sweethearts "It's Been a Long, Long Time" backed by the great Harry James and his orchestra. Harry's band, after opening our show with "It Seems to Me I've Heard That Song Before," later repeats it as our closing theme. That song was popular when songs had melodies we could remember and sing in the shower, in our minds, or maybe even sing to our sweethearts.

Kitty Kallen has stated in interviews that she always sang songs as they were written, without erratic embellishments that detract from the composer's intended melody. No doubt girl singers like Kitty, Helen Forrest, Doris Day, Dinah Shore, Margaret Whiting, Jo Stafford, and Patti Page surely do (or would) listen (with many of us) with concern at the current common practice of singing our National Anthem at many sporting events today with rambling, self styled, up and down phrasing, as if the performers are searching frantically but unsuccessfully for the correct way the song was written.

Kitty was a faithful vocalist to composers from her first job with Jan Savitt's big band while still a teenager in 1936 to her hit recordings later in the 1940's and then still later in the 1950's with more hits such as "Little Things Mean a Lot" and "If I Give My Heart to You." She actually had her own radio show in Philadelphia as a pre-teen and never stopped singing songs the way the writers intended during her times with the big bands of Artie Shaw, Jack Teagarden, Jimmy Dorsey, and Harry James, To me "little things" such as a good melody still "mean a lot" and that's been true for a "long, long time."

From Classics & Curios to you, may God bless you with good melodies, good health, and much joy in the New Year! .

Philco Radio Click to hear the Program of 1-11-15
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This Week's Classics & Curios Show:

"Echoes of Songs and Laughter"

Episode 153

EDDIE HUBBARD & THE BROWSERS: THE AL CAPONE JAZZ BAND

A pleasant discovery for me was the Al Capone Jazz Band recording on this undated Browsers show. Actually the recording is quite good on the tune "Royal Garden Blues." Other fine recordings on this show are from the Benny Goodman Quintet doing "Avalon," Woody Herman and his band performing "Early Autumn," and Tommy Dorsey on "Well, Get It." Also pleasing are "Oh" by Pee Wee Hunt and "Eloise" by Glenn Miller, and a good curio is the amusing "Cement Mixer" as done by Alvino Ray.

Among my favorite Browsers' trivia questions are "Name at least three band leaders who wrote hit songs," "What did bandleaders Gene Krupa, Benny Goodman, and Lionel Hampton have in common?" and "What songs have only two letters in the title, like "Oh"?

Concerning the Al Capone Jazz Band, according to CrimeLibrary.com, Al Capone's two main passions were boxing and music. "With the opening of the Cotton Club in Cicero, Al became a jazz impresario, attracting and cultivating some of the best black jazz musicians of the day."

The Al Capone (Memorial) Jazz Band, alias the six-piece Don Gibson Gang, is apparently still active with Al's descendant "Jeep" Capone, although the relationship is controversial. But the music is good listening and basically smooth, melody driven, cool jazz. The band plays "Royal Garden Blues," and the trivia question concerns who had the big hit of the song in 1919. Incidentally, one of the tunes recorded by the Capone group was "Who's Afraid of Elliot Ness?"

A surprise to me was the "Phooler" mystery singer who sang "Sweet Sue," and I would suspect the identity of the male vocalist may surprise you as well. A hint is that he was a top movie star right up to the time of his passing in 2001.

Eddie Hubbard's Extras include some great songs - songs like "You're Sensational," famous from the movie "High Society," the great "Wang, Wang Blues," Joe Williams' "Well, Alright," and "The Things I Love," which is almost like a humble hymn giving thanks for the beauty of life and love, such as the glow of a sunset in the evening summer sky, silver moonbeams, tulips nodding in the breeze, the robin's serenade, a babbling brook, and especially a sweet voice whispering, "Darling, I love you."

Al-Capone-Jazz-Band-locandina.jpg .

Philco Radio Click to hear the Program of 1-18-15
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This Week's Classics & Curios Show:

"Echoes of Songs and Laughter"

Episode 154

EDDIE HUBBARD & THE BROWSERS: "THAT SENTIMENTAL SANDWICH"

Another Browsers show headlines this episode with songs like "That Sentimental Sandwich" by Dorothy Lamour, "All of Me" by Jimmy Dorsey, "7 Lonely Days" by Georgia Gibbs, "Pennsylvania 6-5000" by the New Modernaires, and "I'll Be Seeing You" by Bing Crosby.

Top trivia questions include challenges to identify the original Modernaires, to name the "Road" movies made by Bing, Bob, and Dorothy, to come up with names of bands for which Glenn Miller worked as arranger, and to identify Phil's "Phooler" by identifying the female vocalist who sings "I Don't Want to Walk Without You."

Also, enjoy more of Eddie's Extras like "That Old Black Magic," "Midnight in Moscow," and "Plantation Boogie."

Here's my own trivia question about the Crosby and Hope "Road" movies. There was another such movie planned for the duo in 1977, but Crosby's death intervened. Can you give the title of the "Road" movie that never was? Well, the title of that film was to be "The Road to the Fountain of Youth." It would have been the eighth "Road" movie. Here's still another question: What "Road" movie was the only one the boys made in which they did not pull their patented "patty cake" routine? The answer: "The Road to Utopia."

Concerning the Modernaires, here is a little background that could be part of more trivia questions. They began as a trio in 1935, the year of my birth, and later added a fourth singer and sang with the Ozzie Nelson, Fred Waring, and Paul Whiteman bands. They hit the big time when they joined Glenn Miller in 1939. Paula Kelly joined the group in 1941 after which came some of their most well known hits, such as "Moonlight Cocktails", "Juke Box Saturday Night," and "Kalamazoo." Check out more about the originals and the new group at the official web site themodernaires.com. .

Philco Radio Click to hear the Program of 1-18-15
New programs added every Sunday


This Week's Classics & Curios Show:

"Echoes of Songs and Laughter"

Episode 154

EDDIE HUBBARD & THE BROWSERS: "THAT SENTIMENTAL SANDWICH"

Another Browsers show headlines this episode with songs like "That Sentimental Sandwich" by Dorothy Lamour, "All of Me" by Jimmy Dorsey, "7 Lonely Days" by Georgia Gibbs, "Pennsylvania 6-5000" by the New Modernaires, and "I'll Be Seeing You" by Bing Crosby.

Top trivia questions include challenges to identify the original Modernaires, to name the "Road" movies made by Bing, Bob, and Dorothy, to come up with names of bands for which Glenn Miller worked as arranger, and to identify Phil's "Phooler" by identifying the female vocalist who sings "I Don't Want to Walk Without You."

Also, enjoy more of Eddie's Extras like "That Old Black Magic," "Midnight in Moscow," and "Plantation Boogie."

Here's my own trivia question about the Crosby and Hope "Road" movies. There was another such movie planned for the duo in 1977, but Crosby's death intervened. Can you give the title of the "Road" movie that never was? Well, the title of that film was to be "The Road to the Fountain of Youth." It would have been the eighth "Road" movie. Here's still another question: What "Road" movie was the only one the boys made in which they did not pull their patented "patty cake" routine? The answer: "The Road to Utopia."

Concerning the Modernaires, here is a little background that could be part of more trivia questions. They began as a trio in 1935, the year of my birth, and later added a fourth singer and sang with the Ozzie Nelson, Fred Waring, and Paul Whiteman bands. They hit the big time when they joined Glenn Miller in 1939. Paula Kelly joined the group in 1941 after which came some of their most well known hits, such as "Moonlight Cocktails", "Juke Box Saturday Night," and "Kalamazoo." Check out more about the originals and the new group at the official web site themodernaires.com. .